EAL Reporting

After consultants came to evaluate the LS and EAL program a common theme was that parents felt as though they did not receive enough communication from EAL teachers.

I believe in some ways this fits into my goal of Clarify.  Clarify is not just for students, but also all other partners.  We are working to develop what data we want to share, how we will share it, and setting guidelines and standards for how to collect this data.

Am hoping this Clarifying of goals and progress will help parents be partners in education with our students.  Some ideas of things would be, when parents know their child’s reading level, they help them select just right books.

Evaluating my Survey Results

Overall, pretty pleased with my survey results.  Very helpful to evaluate the Item Response Detail as opposed to the flowers page.

I received one unfavorable response in most categories.  Teaching young children, many of whom are EAL students, I do question the validity of the surveys to some extent.  Was the one kid mad at me for telling him to sit down and just put the negative response for all answers?  Did one student confuse the language and just put negative response for all answers without reading the questions?

Also, as an EAL teacher, while I do lead whole group instruction some of the time, the majority of my work is done in small groups or concentrated on helping students who may need a reteach or some additional help with a concept.  Thus, I also question the validity of the survey, as many questions don’t apply as directly to me as they do to the homeroom teacher.

Clarify was one of my lowest categories and it is also my goal.  I will continue to work on this.

Setting My Goal – Clarify

After reviewing my Teaching Checklist, I realized one area I could grow in as an educator is in clarifying.  Specifically, I am weak in allowing for reflection and reminding students of the teaching point at the end of a lesson.

I believe I am often weak in this in that I always want to cram as much instruction/independent work time into a lesson as possible.  However, one of my cooperating teachers does an excellent job of modeling this reflection in his lessons.  I hope to emulate this while doing both large group instruction, as well as strategy groups.

I want to remind students of the content/language objectives, and also allow them time to reflect on how well they grasped the content.  I tend to do this assessment/reflection more on my own via their independent work/the product they produce, but want to allow students the opportunity to do their own self-assessment/reflection.

Welcome!

Welcome to your Professional Learning Blog! This is a place for you to post your goals, and reflect on them throughout the year.

  • Decide on your goal, perhaps in consultation with your colleagues or principal, and create a post to share with this online professional learning community that you are now a part of! Categorise this post in Goal Setting. Set your goal by considering:
    • Self assessment and reflection based on new teacher standards  (Tripod 7C’s)
    • Previous or new observation data from peers and principals
    • Student surveys (online surveys developed and aligned with 7C’s)
  • Identify colleagues, coaches, principals etc. that will play a supporting role in achieving your goal, and invite them to view and comment on your post. Encourage them to bookmark your blog and visit regularly.
  • Throughout the year, collect and share evidence to support your progress. Categorise these posts in Reflection.
  • Encourage your colleagues to share your learning journey by engaging with your blog. In return, engage with their blog (and others across the School)
  • You may also like to share work that your students have created or your own professional achievements that may not be directly related to your goal setting. This is encouraged! Categorise these posts as Showcase.

If you need support using this platform, please don’t hesitate to contact Ed Tech, we are always happy to be of assistance!

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